Memories

I recently was in the area where I spent my honeymoon over 30 years ago. While enjoying the exceptional fall foliage decorating the forests, I decided to explore up an old dirt forest road, which once took me to my summer home on a Forest Service Fire Tower, named Red Plume Lookout.

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Hungry Horse Reservoir with Red Plume Mountain one of those peaks in the background

Although the day was chilly, a bright blue sky reflected in the waters of the reservoir as the sun shone golden on the native grasses and gold-needled Western Larch trees.

As I drove I reflected on that summer so long ago, when as a young woman and newly wed bride, I felt I had life solidly in my hands. Returning home this week, I dug into my photo album from that time, and pulled my ‘childhood’ steamer trunk out to retrieve some of the journals I kept from my time on Red Plume Lookout.

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Photos from the 1970’s photo album.

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3rd Generation Buttermilk Biscuits

When SF Editor Stephanie gave me this months COOK THIS column assignment, and told me the issue was devoted to grandparents and family traditions, I knew exactly which food to feature. My grandmothers’ buttermilk biscuits!

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As I prepared to make the recipe and shoot the photos, I gathered grandma’s 1894 The Housekeeper cookbook, vintage baking props, and all the ingredients. I started taking notes for this article as I progressed through her biscuit recipe. It was only as I was cleaning up while the fragrant aroma of fresh baked bread wafted from the oven that I had the realization of the fact that most of our SF readers are much younger than I, and that their association with grandparents would be of my own mom’s age or even younger. I mean, after all, I’m a grandmother myself!

So I pulled my mom’s 1956 Betty Crocker cookbook off the shelf and also grabbed my 1975 Doubleday cookbook, to compare buttermilk biscuit recipes over the generations.

The most notable difference wasn’t in the ingredients, but in the baking. Since electric ranges weren’t common in most rural areas like my Grandmothers Minnesota farm, until the early 1940’s, the recipes did not use “preheat, bake at 450 degrees” nor even suggest how long the biscuits should bake as cooking with wood was such a variable heat source.Read More »

My Love Affair With Montana, Continues

DSC_6564“I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.”  L.M. Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables

“I’m in love with Montana.” C.D.D. 

My Subaru is loaded with the essentials … tripod, cameras, lens, notebook, map, and GPS. Oh, and a backpack with a few clothes and other essentials. So off I go, heading east over the Continental Divide to my road trip hub for a few days and nights–the Sacajawea Hotel in Three Forks.

The Sac was built in 1910 to service tourists traveling through on the railroad. Now on the Register of Historic Hotels, this white clapboard beauty is pure bliss. So when I got a call to come stay and review it, naturally I said “yes!”.

The lovely covered front porch is lined with white rocking chairs, scattered wool throws for guest use, and season appropriate floral arrangements. Greeted with a smile and a glass of chilled champagne, I am escorted to my room on the third floor. Up the original wooden stairway, past hall windows and the rustic wood doors of other guest rooms.

 

 

 

Barely taking the time to drop my things off, I hustle out to capture the late afternoon golden hour for some photos.

 

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I’m Excited!

Recently I walked into my favorite Spokane restaurant, Chaps, for brunch. As I was at the counter contemplating how to par down my desired selections to a reasonable, manageable order, I had the unexpected pleasure of meeting Celeste Shaw, the owner. Our conversation was sparked by a small, sterling silver Montana state necklace around my neck. Turns out Celeste is also a Montana girl. Within minutes we were sharing our love for our State, vintage everything, food, and each other!

I mentioned I was a photo-journalist and she mentioned she was preparing to release the Flea Market Style magazine. Our connection went from spark to all-systems-go!

Waiting for the premier issue to hit the newsstands took a lot of patience but it did, I devoured the issue with glee, and once I had the feel for where she wanted to go with this new baby of hers, ideas to complement started flowing from my creative brain!

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Congratulations Celeste and co-editor Ki Nassauer on your delightful publication! I look forward to pitching some ideas for future issues as I hop on board this vintage styling train!

 

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New Years Day Comfort Food

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It’s New Year’s Day 2017. Maybe you stayed up a little too late and drank a little too much, celebrating last night. Or maybe its freezing cold out and you just want a stay-at-home family day of relaxing. No matter what, this month I’ve chosen a hearty winter comfort food for you to cook, that is sure to satisfy! (As a plus, this carb and protein packed dish gives your body a boost of healing energy!)

Carbonara is found on restaurant menus around the world and is defined as a pasta sauce denoting a sauce made with bacon, ham, egg, and cheese. My adapted recipe is full of Montana flavor, quick, easy, and makes for a beautiful presentation on your dining table.

This rich, creamy (without cream!) Italian pasta and sausage based one-dish-meal is delicious! Serve with a salad at mid-day (or even brunch!) for a new family favorite. Many cultures consider this a breakfast food, it’s so versatile and good for any meal of the day.  Garlic toast is always a nice side as well, to compliment and complete the Italian holiday menu.Read More »

Exploring 101

Recently, an acquaintance requested that I take her with me on a typical exploration trip. An admirer of my photography and stories, she wanted to witness a day-in-the-life-of me on an adventure. I was, and am, flattered.

Heading north out of the greater Spokane area, we chose a random paved road neither of us had ever been on. We chatted as we drove along with no destination in mind, just admiring the natural landscape of Washington state, but not really seeing anything photo worthy.

As we drove along about 65 mph, I was being proactive in my search for something rare, unique, and beautiful. dsc_8959A foreign shape back in the woods caught my attention. As a child learning to hunt from my father, my brain was shaped to take notice when something in my vision was out-of-place. Skinny legs in a forest of thick tree trunks. A dark mass standing out green bushes. So a granite tombstone in an overgrown field of apple trees, bushes, and tall grasses was worth turning around for.

Let the real adventure begin! Wonderment, excitement, and the thrill of finding something so unusual filled our hearts with joy! Strapping on our camera’s, we began to slowly explore the area discovering additional tombstones in this old and overrun cemetery.

Most of epitaphs were dated in the 1800’s with a only a few in the early 1900’s. Considering most of the population during this time were poor farmers, the beautiful granite headstones are a tribute to the honor of the family. Many, like the one pictured above, marked several family members buried together in a family plot.

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These are graves not visited nor maintained, by the generations since. Perhaps the families have moved away as small farms were no longer sustainable and people moved into the cities for occupation. Smaller trees and shrubs planted nearby a plot over 100 years ago, have now overtaken the cemetery, turning it into a forest.

Apple trees, wild roses, chokecherries, and weeds have buried, hidden, and adorn the cemetery with color, texture, and beauty.

Even though it was early September, we were amazed to find this fresh Lupine wildflower. Typically a late spring bloom, it graced the floor of this forgotten place with the reminder that life goes on.

We enjoyed several hours on this wonderful adventure, while pausing to read each headstone. We’d often stop to question, then surmise the stories of the deceased buried there. So many had died in 1889. Was there a disease that caused so many of various ages to lose their lives at the same time? So many young children. So many young mothers. The grief and tears of those who had stood upon that land so long ago, as the final words were spoken over the freshly turned earth were felt by us.

We honored. We respected. We valued that afternoon in what we later learned was the Mica Cemetery.

My story could end here, but as part of the continuing education, let me add that once home, the computer searches began. Wanting to know the history behind the photos we now possessed as mementos and memory sparkers. Several more hours of sharing our finds with one another only added to the delight of this adventure, off the beaten path.

We could have gone shopping and out to lunch. We chose the path less traveled and were the better for it.

Chocolate, Photography & Friday … ah!

The mornings are beginning to get cold here in Western Montana, which means we need to start closing a few of the open windows at night. This morning the inside temperature was hovering around 60 degrees ~ just a might nippy for our relaxed and lazy routine!

With steaming cups of hot chocolate and coffee in hand and the glorious morning sunshine streaming in, thoughts automatically turned to capturing it with some dreamy mood shots.

I hope you enjoy these and the shared emotions of each shot!