Oh! Let the Sunshine In!

I love being a Montanan like a flower loves the sun! But like a flower, if I don’t get sunshine for weeks or months on end, I start to wither and fade away. Vitamin D is as essential to those of us living in these northern, low-sunlight, always so covered and bundled up against the cold, states almost as much as we need oxygen to breathe. But even with all the supplements and strategies for winter survival, sometimes a girls’ just gotta do what a girls’ gotta do. For me, shortly after ringing in the new year, this meant going on a road trip to sunshine California for a few months!

Yes, this is not unusual. Montana breeds a whole lot of snowbirds who fly the coop every winter in their RV’s, heading to warmer climates. But this was the first year that I got to participate in this migration south.

 

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Simple Pleasures

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I’ve always been a good Girl Scout. “Be prepared”. (Or is that the Boy Scouts motto?) Either way, I’m always (usually) prepared.  Like today for example. A friend stopped over on her way home from some holiday shopping.   I offered her a cocktail and a snack while she relaxed and showed me some of her awesome last minute Christmas gift finds.

One of my favorite holiday cocktails–always festive, refreshing, and yummy–is a cape cod with a couple of smashed frozen cranberries and a sprig of fresh rosemary. Sugared rim is an option.

Recipe

1 shot Montana Silver Vodka

2 shots Ocean Spray Cranberry juice

1 shot Sprite (or other fizzy sweet drink)

6 smashed frozen cranberries

Put all ingredients in a shaker with about 1/2 cup of crushed ice. Pour into your favorite festive cocktail glass and garnish with a fresh rosemary sprig

 

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Add some Boursin soft cheese flavored with shallot and chive on some freshly warmed baguette bread and we had ourselves an impromptu holiday gathering!

 

I’m Excited!

Recently I walked into my favorite Spokane restaurant, Chaps, for brunch. As I was at the counter contemplating how to par down my desired selections to a reasonable, manageable order, I had the unexpected pleasure of meeting Celeste Shaw, the owner. Our conversation was sparked by a small, sterling silver Montana state necklace around my neck. Turns out Celeste is also a Montana girl. Within minutes we were sharing our love for our State, vintage everything, food, and each other!

I mentioned I was a photo-journalist and she mentioned she was preparing to release the Flea Market Style magazine. Our connection went from spark to all-systems-go!

Waiting for the premier issue to hit the newsstands took a lot of patience but it did, I devoured the issue with glee, and once I had the feel for where she wanted to go with this new baby of hers, ideas to complement started flowing from my creative brain!

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Congratulations Celeste and co-editor Ki Nassauer on your delightful publication! I look forward to pitching some ideas for future issues as I hop on board this vintage styling train!

 

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New Years Day Comfort Food

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It’s New Year’s Day 2017. Maybe you stayed up a little too late and drank a little too much, celebrating last night. Or maybe its freezing cold out and you just want a stay-at-home family day of relaxing. No matter what, this month I’ve chosen a hearty winter comfort food for you to cook, that is sure to satisfy! (As a plus, this carb and protein packed dish gives your body a boost of healing energy!)

Carbonara is found on restaurant menus around the world and is defined as a pasta sauce denoting a sauce made with bacon, ham, egg, and cheese. My adapted recipe is full of Montana flavor, quick, easy, and makes for a beautiful presentation on your dining table.

This rich, creamy (without cream!) Italian pasta and sausage based one-dish-meal is delicious! Serve with a salad at mid-day (or even brunch!) for a new family favorite. Many cultures consider this a breakfast food, it’s so versatile and good for any meal of the day.  Garlic toast is always a nice side as well, to compliment and complete the Italian holiday menu.Read More »

Exploring 101

Recently, an acquaintance requested that I take her with me on a typical exploration trip. An admirer of my photography and stories, she wanted to witness a day-in-the-life-of me on an adventure. I was, and am, flattered.

Heading north out of the greater Spokane area, we chose a random paved road neither of us had ever been on. We chatted as we drove along with no destination in mind, just admiring the natural landscape of Washington state, but not really seeing anything photo worthy.

As we drove along about 65 mph, I was being proactive in my search for something rare, unique, and beautiful. dsc_8959A foreign shape back in the woods caught my attention. As a child learning to hunt from my father, my brain was shaped to take notice when something in my vision was out-of-place. Skinny legs in a forest of thick tree trunks. A dark mass standing out green bushes. So a granite tombstone in an overgrown field of apple trees, bushes, and tall grasses was worth turning around for.

Let the real adventure begin! Wonderment, excitement, and the thrill of finding something so unusual filled our hearts with joy! Strapping on our camera’s, we began to slowly explore the area discovering additional tombstones in this old and overrun cemetery.

Most of epitaphs were dated in the 1800’s with a only a few in the early 1900’s. Considering most of the population during this time were poor farmers, the beautiful granite headstones are a tribute to the honor of the family. Many, like the one pictured above, marked several family members buried together in a family plot.

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These are graves not visited nor maintained, by the generations since. Perhaps the families have moved away as small farms were no longer sustainable and people moved into the cities for occupation. Smaller trees and shrubs planted nearby a plot over 100 years ago, have now overtaken the cemetery, turning it into a forest.

Apple trees, wild roses, chokecherries, and weeds have buried, hidden, and adorn the cemetery with color, texture, and beauty.

Even though it was early September, we were amazed to find this fresh Lupine wildflower. Typically a late spring bloom, it graced the floor of this forgotten place with the reminder that life goes on.

We enjoyed several hours on this wonderful adventure, while pausing to read each headstone. We’d often stop to question, then surmise the stories of the deceased buried there. So many had died in 1889. Was there a disease that caused so many of various ages to lose their lives at the same time? So many young children. So many young mothers. The grief and tears of those who had stood upon that land so long ago, as the final words were spoken over the freshly turned earth were felt by us.

We honored. We respected. We valued that afternoon in what we later learned was the Mica Cemetery.

My story could end here, but as part of the continuing education, let me add that once home, the computer searches began. Wanting to know the history behind the photos we now possessed as mementos and memory sparkers. Several more hours of sharing our finds with one another only added to the delight of this adventure, off the beaten path.

We could have gone shopping and out to lunch. We chose the path less traveled and were the better for it.